A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Meteor

View Scan · View Transcription · from pages 1289, 1290

View Scan · View Transcription · from pages 1289, 1290

Méteor. n.s. [meteore, Fr. μετέωρα.] Any bodies in the air or sky that are of a flux and transitory nature.

Look'd he or red, or pale, or sad, or merrily?
What observation mad'st thou in this case,
Of his heart's meteors tilting in his face?
Shakespeare.

She began to cast with herself from what coast this blazing star must rise upon the horizon of Ireland; for there had the like meteor strong influence before. Bacon's Henry VII.

These burning fits but meteors be,
Whose matter in thee soon is spent:
Thy beauty, and all parts which are in thee,
Are an unchangeable firmament.
Donne.

Then flaming meteors, hung in air, were seen,
And thunders rattled through a sky serene.
Dryden's Æn.

Why was I rais'd the meteor of the world,
Hung in the skies, and blazing as I travell'd,
Till all my fires were spent; and then cast downward
To be trod out by Cæsar?
Dryden's All for Love.

O poet, thou hadst been discreteer,
Hanging the monarch's hat so high,
If thou hadst dubb'd thy star a meteor,
Which did but blaze, and rove, and die.
Prior.

Sources: Bacon, Francis (396) · Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors (24) · Donne, John (44) · Dryden, John (788) · Prior, Matthew (162)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Meteor." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: November 29, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=12794.


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