A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Car (noun)

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 327

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 327

Car. n.s. [car, Welch; karre, Dut. cꞃæꞇ, Sax. carrus, Lat.]

  1. A small carriage of burden, usually drawn by one horse or two.

    When a lady comes in a coach to our shops, it must be followed by a car loaded with Mr. Wood's money. Swift.

  2. In poetical language, a chariot; a chariot of war, or triumph.

    Henry is dead, and never shall revive:
    Upon a wooden coffin we attend,
    And death's dishonourable victory,
    We with our stately presence glorify,
    Like captives bound to a triumphant car.
    Shakesp. Hen. VI.

    Wilt thou aspire to guide the heav'nly car,
    And with thy daring folly burn the world.
    Shakesp.

    And the gilded car of day,
    His glowing axle doth allay
    In the steep Atlantick stream.
    Milton.

    See, where he comes, the darling of the war!
    See millions crouding round the gilded car!
    Prior.

  3. The Charles's wain, or Bear; a constellation.

    Ev'ry fixt and ev'ry wand'ring star,
    The Pleiads, Hyads, and the Northern Car.
    Dryden.

Sources: Dryden, John (788) · Shakespeare's Henry VI, Part 1 (48) · Milton, John (449) · Prior, Matthew (162) · Swift, Jonathan (306) · Shakespeare's Two Gentlemen of Verona (41)

Attributes: Dutch (90) · Latin (690) · Noun Substantive (1269) · Saxon (215) · Welsh (Welch) (27)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Car (noun)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: January 30, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=12979.


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