A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Acquaint

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 75

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 75

To Acqua'int. v.a. [accointer, Fr.]

  1. To make familiar with; applied either to persons or things.

    We that acquaint ourselves with ev'ry zone,
    And pass the tropicks, and behold each pole;
    When we come home, are to ourselves unknown,
    And unacquainted still with our own soul.
    Sir J. Davies.

    There with thee, new welcome saint,
    Like fortunes may her soul acquaint;
    With thee there clad in radiant sheen.
    Mil. on March. Win.

    Before a man can speak on any subject, it is necessary to be acquainted with it. Locke on Education, § 171.

    Acquaint yourselves with things ancient and modern, natural, civil, and religious, domestic and national; things of your own and foreign countries; and, above all, be well acquainted with God and yourselves; learn animal nature, and the workings of your own spirits. Watts's Logick.

  2. To inform.

    But for some other reasons, my grave Sir,
    Which is not fit you know, I not acquaint
    My father of this business.
    Shakespeare's Twelfth Night.

    I have lately received a letter from a friend in the country, wherein he acquaints me, that two or three men of the town are got among them, and have brought down particular words and phrases, which were never before in those parts. Tatler.

Sources: Davies, John (45) · Locke, John (269) · Milton, John (449) · Tatler (23) · Shakespeare's Twelfth Night (36) · Watts, Isaac (117)

Attributes: French (385) · Verb Active (289)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Acquaint." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: December 11, 2013. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=13254.


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