A Dictionary of the English Language
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Acquit

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 76

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 76

To Acqu'it. v.a. [acquiter, Fr. See QUIT.]

  1. To set free.

    Ne do I wish (for wishing were but vain)
    To be acquit from my continual smart;
    But joy her thrall for ever to remain,
    And yield for pledge my poor captived heart.
    Spens. Son. xlii.

  2. To clear from a charge of guilt; to absolve; opposed to condemn, either simply with an accusative, as, the jury acquitted him, or with the particles from or of, which is more common, before the crime.

    If I sin, then thou markest me, and thou wilt not acquit me from mine iniquity. Job, x. 14.

    By the suffrage of the most and best, he is already acquitted, and, by the sentence of some, condemned. Dryden's Conquest of Granada, Dedic.

    He that judges, without informing himself to the utmost that he is capable, cannot acquit himself of judging amiss. Locke.

    Neither do I reflect upon the memory of his majesty, whom I entirely acquit of any imputation upon this matter. Swift.

  3. To clear from any obligation.

    Steady to my principles, and not dispirited with my afflictions, I have, by the blessing of God on my endeavours, overcome all difficulties; and, in some measure, acquitted myself of the debt which I owed the publick, when I undertook this work. Dryden.

  4. In a similar sense, it is said, The man has acquitted himself well; that is, he discharged his duty.

Sources: Dryden, John (788) · The Bible - Job (27) · Locke, John (269) · Spenser, Edmund (254) · Swift, Jonathan (306)

Attributes: French (385) · Verb Active (289)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Acquit." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: December 16, 2013. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=13282.


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