A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Admiration

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 83

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 83

Admira'tion. n.s. [admiratio, Lat.]

  1. Wonder; the act of admiring or wondering.

    Indu'd with human voice, and human sense.
    Reasoning to admiration.
    Milton's Paradise Lost, b. ix.

    They are imitations of the passions, which always move, and therefore, consequently, please; for, without motion, there can be no delight: which cannot be considered but as an active passion. When we view those elevated ideas of nature, the result of that view is admiration, which is always the cause of pleasure. Dryd. Dufresnoy, Pref.

    There is a pleasure in admiration, and this is that which properly causeth admiration, when we discover a great deal in an object, which we understand to be excellent; and yet we see, we know not how much more beyond that, which our understandings cannot fully reach and comprehend. Tillotson's Serm.

  2. It is taken sometimes in a bad sense, though generally in a good.

    Your boldness I with admiration see;
    What hope had you to gain a queen like me?
    Because a hero forc'd me once away,
    Am I thought fit to be a second prey?
    Dryd.

Sources: Dryden, John (788) · Milton, John (449) · Tillotson, John (68)

Attributes: Latin (690) · Noun Substantive (1269)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Admiration." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: May 21, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=13756.


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