A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Jealousy

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1041

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1041

Jéalousy. n.s. [jalousie, French, from jealous.]

  1. Suspicion in love.

    But gnawing jealousy, out of their sight
    Sitting alone, his bitter lips did bite.
    Fairy Queen.

    The sweet woman leads an ill life with him; he's a very jealousy man. Shakespeare.

    How all the other passions fleet to air,
    As doubtful thoughts, and rash embrac'd despair;
    And shudd ring fear, and green-ey'd jealousy!

    O love, be moderate; allay thy extasy. Shakespeare.

    Why did you suffer Jachimo,
    Slight thing of Italy,
    To taint his noble heart and brain
    With needless jealousy?
    Shakespeare's Cymbeline.

    Small jealousies, 'tis true, inflame desire;
    Too great, not fan, but quite blow out the fire.
    Dryden.

  2. Suspicious fear.

    The obstinacy in Essex, in refusing to treat with the king, proceeded only from his jealousy, that when the king had got him into his hands, he would take revenge upon him. Clarend.

  3. Suspicious caution, vigilance, or rivalry.

Sources: Clarendon, Edward (73) · Shakespeare's Cymbeline (73) · Dryden, John (788) · Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice (83) · Shakespeare's Merry Wives of Windsor (95) · Spenser, Edmund (254)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Jealousy." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: January 17, 2013. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=14121.


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