A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Admit

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 84

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 84

To Admi't. v.a. [admitto, Lat.]

  1. To suffer to enter; to grant entrance.

    Does not one table Bavius still admit?

  2. To suffer to enter upon an office; in which sense, the phrase of admission into a college, &c. is used.

    The treasurer found it no hard matter so far to terrify him, that, for the king's service, as was pretended, he admitted, for a six-clark, a person recommended by him. Clarendon.

  3. To allow an argument or position.

    Suppose no weapon can thy valour's pride
    Subdue, that by no force thou may'st be won,
    Admit no steel can hurt or wound thy side,
    And be it heav'n hath thee such favour done.
    Fairfax, b. ii.

    This argument is like to have the less effect on me, seeing I cannot easily admit the inference. Locke.

  4. To allow, or grant in general; sometimes with the particle of.

    If you once admit of a latitude, that thoughts may be exalted, and images raised above the life, that leads you insensibly from your own principles to mine. Dryd. on Heroic Poetry.

Sources: Clarendon, Edward (73) · Dryden, John (788) · Fairfax, Edward (30) · Locke, John (269)

Attributes: Latin (690) · Verb Active (289)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Admit." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: April 7, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=14199.


  1. The first quote belongs to Alexander Pope.

  2. Brandi on April 7th, 2014 at 11:15 pm

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