A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Adventurer

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 87

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 87

Adve'nturer. n.s. [adventurier, Fr.]

He that seeks occasions of hazard; he that puts himself in the hands of chance.

He is a great adventurer, said he,
That hath his sword through hard assay foregone,
And now hath vow'd, till he avenged be
Of that despight, never to wear none.
Fairy Queen, b. ii.

The kings of England did not make the conquest of Ireland their own work; it was begun by particular adventurers, and other voluntaries, who came to seek their fortunes in Ireland. Sir John Davies on Ireland.

In this action, highly commendable, he intended to hazard his own action, that so the more easily he might win adventurers, who else were like to be less forward. Sir W. Raleigh's Ess.

Had it not been for the British, which the late wars drew over, and of adventurers or soldiers seated here, the country had, by the last war, and plague, been left, in a manner, destitute. Temple's Miscellanies.

Their wealthy trade from pirate's rapine free,
Our merchants shall no more adventurers be.
Dryden.

Sources: Davies, John (45) · Dryden, John (788) · Raleigh, Walter (68) · Spenser, Edmund (254) · Temple, William (54)

Attributes: French (385) · Noun Substantive (1269)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Adventurer." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: April 27, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=14407.


  1. In the Raleigh quote, the original text reads “he intended to hazard his own person.”

  2. Brandi on April 27th, 2014 at 4:07 pm

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