A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Affiance (noun)

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 93

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 93

Affi'ance. n.s. [affiance, from affier, Fr.]

  1. A marriage-contract.

    At last such grace I found, and means I wrought,
    That I that lady to my spouse had won,
    Accord of friends, consent of parents sought,
    Affiance made, my happiness begun.
    Fairy Queen, b. ii.

  2. Trust in general; confidence; secure reliance.

    The duke is virtuous, mild, and too well given
    To dream on evil, or to work my downfal. —
    — Ah! what's more dangerous than this fond affiance?
    Seems he a dove? his feathers are but borrowed.
    Shakesp. Henry VI.

  3. Trust in the divine promises and protection. To this sense it is now almost confined.

    It receives him into a covenant of grace, where there is pardon reached out to all truly penitent sinners, and assistance promised, and engaged, and bestowed upon very easy conditions, viz. humility, prayer, and affiance in him. Hammond's Fund.

    There can be no surer way to success, than by disclaiming all confidence in ourselves, and referring the events of things to God with an implicit affiance. Atterbury's Sermons.

Sources: Atterbury, Francis (75) · Hammond, Henry (47) · Shakespeare's Henry VI, Part 2 (49) · Spenser, Edmund (254)

Attributes: French (385) · Noun Substantive (1269)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Affiance (noun)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: January 28, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=15578.


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