A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Servant (noun)

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1794

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1794

Sérvant. n.s. [servant, French; servus, Latin.]

  1. One who attends another, and acts at his command. The correlative of master.

    We are one in fortune; both
    Fell by our servants, by those men we lov'd most.
    Shakesp.

    I had rather be a country servant maid,
    Than a great queen with this condition.
    Shak. R. III.

                    He disdain'd not
    Thenceforth the form of servant to assume.
    Milton.

    For master or for servant here to call
    Was all alike, where only two were all.
    Dryden.

  2. One in a state of subjection. Unusual.

                    Being unprepar'd,
    Our will became the servant to defect,
    Which else should free have wrong'd.
    Shak. Macbeth.

  3. A word of civility used to superiours or equals.

    This subjection, due from all men to all men, is something more than the compliment of course, when our betters tell us they are our humble servants, but understand us to be their slaves. Swift.

Sources: Dryden, John (788) · Shakespeare's Henry VIII (62) · Shakespeare's Macbeth (136) · Milton, John (449) · Shakespeare's Richard III (63) · Swift, Jonathan (306)

Attributes: French (385) · Latin (690) · Noun Substantive (1269)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Servant (noun)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: September 10, 2013. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=16475.


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