A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
        Search Transcribed Entries:

Slide (verb neuter)

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1855

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1855

To Slide. v.n. slid, preterite; slidden, participle pass. [ꞅlıꝺan, ꞅlıꝺnꝺ, sliding, Saxon; slijden, Dutch; ys-lithe, Welsh.]

  1. To pass along smoothly; to slip; to glide.

    Sounds do not only slide upon the surface of a smooth body, but communicate with the spirits in the pores of the body. Bacon's Natural History.

    Ulysses, Sthenelus, Tisander slide
    Down by a rope, Machaon was their guide.
    Denham.

  2. To move without change of the foot.

    Oh Ladon, happy Ladon, rather slide than run by her, lest thou shouldt make her legs slip from her. Sidney.

    Smooth sliding without step. Milton.

    He that once sins, like him that slides on ice,
    Goes swiftly down the slippery ways of vice:
    Though conscience checks him, yet those rubs gone o'er,
    He slides on smoothly, and looks back no more.
    Dryden.

  3. To pass inadvertently.

    Make a door and a bar for thy mouth: beware thou slide not by it. Ecclus xxviii. 26.

  4. To pass unnoticed.

    In the princess I could find no apprehension of what I said or did, but with a calm carelessness, letting every thing slide justly, as we do by their speeches, who neither in matter nor person do any way belong unto us. Sidney.

  5. To pass along by silent and unobserved progression.

                            Thou shalt
    Hate all, shew charity to none;
    But let the famisht flesh slide from the bone,
    Ere thou relieve the beggar.
    Shakespeare.

    Then no day void of bliss, of pleasure leaving,
    Ages shall slide away without perceiving.
    Dryden.

    Rescue me from their ignoble hands:
    Let me kiss yours when you my wound begin,
    Then easy death will slide with pleasure in.
    Dryden.

    Their eye slides over the pages, or the words slide over their eyes, and vanish like a rhapsody of evening tales. Watts.

  6. To pass silently and gradually from good to bad.

    Nor could they have slid into those brutish immoralities of life, had they duly manured those first practical notions and dictates of right reason. South.

  7. To pass without difficulty or obstruction.

    Such of them should be retained as slide easily of themselves into English compounds without violence to the ear. Pope.

    Begin with sense, of ev'ry art the soul,
    Parts answ'ring parts shall slide into a whole;
    Nature shall join you, time shall make it grow
    A work to wonder at.
    Pope.

  8. To move upon the ice by a single impulse, without change of foot.

    The gallants dancing by the river side,
    They bathe in summer, and in winter slide.
    Waller.

  9. To fall by errour.

    The discovering and reprehension of these colours cannot be done but out of a very universal knowledge of things, which so cleareth man's judgment, as it is the less apt to slide into any errour. Bacon.

  10. To be not firm.

                                Ye fair!
    Be greatly cautious of your sliding hearts.
    Thomson.

  11. To pass with a free and gentle course or flow.

Sources: Bacon, Francis (396) · Denham, John (75) · Dryden, John (788) · The Bible - Ecclesiasticus (27) · Milton, John (449) · Pope, Alexander (393) · Sidney, Philip (140) · South, Robert (158) · Thomson, James (73) · Shakespeare's Timon of Athens (32) · Waller, Edmund (63) · Watts, Isaac (117)

Attributes: Dutch (90) · Saxon (215) · Verb Neuter (131) · Welsh (Welch) (27)

Search for this word in: American Heritage · Cambridge · Dictionary.com · The Free Dictionary · Longman · Merriam-Webster · OneLook · Oxford Dictionaries · Vocabulary.com · Wiktionary · Wordnik

Discuss this entry in the forums.

Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Slide (verb neuter)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: February 12, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=17483.


Leave a Reply


Disclaimer:
johnsonsdictionaryonline.com is completely free to use. Johnson's dictionary is in the public domain, but please respect the hours of work put into this site by linking to it or crediting it. This site assumes no liability for its content or for the content of external sites linked to it, and has no warranty or guarantee concerning accuracy or availability.