A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Cross (adjective)

View Scan · View Transcription · from pages 509, 510

View Scan · View Transcription · from pages 509, 510

Cross. adj. [from the substantive.]

  1. Transverse; falling a-thwart something else.

    Whatsoever penumbra should be made in the circles by the cross refraction of the second prism, all that penumbra would be conspicuous in the right lines which touch those circles. Newtons's Opticks.

    The sun, in that space of time, by his annual contrary motion eastward, will be advanced near a degree of the ecliptick, cross to the motion of the equator. Holder on Time.

    The ships must needs encounter, when they either advance towards one another in direct lines, or meet in the intersection of cross ones. Bentley's Sermons.

  2. Oblique; lateral.

                                    Was this a face,
    To stand against the deep dread bolted thunder?
    In the most terrible and nimble stroke
    Of quick cross lightning?
    Shakespeare's King Lear.

  3. Adverse; opposite.

    Were both love's captives; but with fate so cross,
    One must be happy by the other's loss.
    Dryden's Aurengzebe.

    Cross to our interests, curbing sense and sin;
    Oppress'd without, and undermin'd within,
    It thrives through pain.
    Dryden.

    It runs cross to the belief and apprehension of the rest of mankind; a difficulty, which a modest and good man is scarce able to encounter. Atterbury's Sermons.

  4. Perverse; untractable.

    When, through the cross circumstances of a man's temper or condition, the enjoyment of a pleasure would certainly expose him to a greater inconvenience, then religion bids him quit it. South's Sermons.

  5. Peevish; fretful; ill-humoured.

    Did ever any man upon the rack afflict himself, because he had received a cross answer from his mistress? Taylor.

    All cross and distasteful humours, and whatever else may render the conversation of men grievous and uneasy to one another, must be shunned. Tillotson, Sermon 5.

  6. Contrary; contradictory.

    The mind brings all the ends of a long and various hypothesis together; sees how one part coheres with, and depends upon another; and so clears off all the appearing contrarieties and contradictions, that seemed to lie cross and uncouth, and to make the whole unintelligible. South's Sermons.

  7. Contrary to wish; unfortunate.

    We learn the great reasonableness of not only a contented, but also a thankful acquiescence in any condition, and under the crossest and severest passages of providence. South's Sermons.

    I cannot, without some regret, behold the cross and unlucky issue of my design; for by my dislike of disputes, I am engaged in one. Glanv.

  8. Interchanged.

    Evarchus made a cross marriage also with Dorilaus's sister, and shortly left her with child of the famous Pyrocles. Sidney.

    They had long conference, not only upon commerce, but upon cross marriages, to be had between the king's son and the archduke's daughter; and again, between the archduke's son and the king's daughter. Bacon's Henry VII.

Sources: Atterbury, Francis (75) · Bacon, Francis (396) · Bentley, Richard (57) · Dryden, John (788) · Glanvill, Joseph (53) · Holder, William (38) · Shakespeare's King Lear (144) · Newton, Isaac (40) · Sidney, Philip (140) · South, Robert (158) · Taylor, Jeremy (57) · Tillotson, John (68)

Attributes: Adjective (426)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Cross (adjective)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: February 9, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=18387.


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