A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Sabbath

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1736

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1736
Sabáoth.
Sábbath.
n.s. [An Hebrew word signifying rest; sabbat, French; sabatum, Latin.]
  1. A day appointed by God among the Jews, and from them established among Christians for publick worship; the seventh day set apart from works of labour to be employed in piety.

    Holy Lord God of sabaoth. Common Prayer.

                    I purpose,
    And by our holy sabbath have I sworn,
    To have the due and forfeit of my bond.
    Shakespeare.

    Glad we return'd up to the coasts of light,
    Ere sabbath ev'ning.
    Milton.

    Here ev'ry day was sabbath: only free
    From hours of pray'r, for hours of charity,
    Such as the Jews from servile toil releast,
    Where works of mercy were a part of rest:
    Such as blest angels exercise above,
    Vary'd with sacred hymns and acts of love;
    Such sabbaths as that one she now enjoys,
    Ev'n that perpetual one, which she employs:
    For such vicissitudes in heav'n there are,
    In praise alternate, and alternate pray'r.
    Dryden.

  2. Intermission of pain or sorrow; time of rest.

    Never any sabbath of release
    Could free his travels and afflictions deep.
    Daniel's Civil War.

    Nor can his blessed soul look down from heav'n,
    Or break th' eternal sabbath of his rest,
    To see her miseries on earth.
    Dryden.

    Peaceful sleep out the sabbath of the tomb,
    And wake to raptures in a life to come.
    Pope.

Sources: Common Prayer (8) · Daniel, Samuel (28) · Dryden, John (788) · Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice (83) · Milton, John (449) · Pope, Alexander (393)

Attributes: French (385) · Hebrew (11) · Latin (690) · Noun Substantive (1269)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Sabbath." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: August 31, 2013. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=2636.


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