A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Ake

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 105

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 105

To Ake. v.n. [from ἄχος, Gr. and therefore more grammatically written ache. See Ache.]

  1. To feel a lasting pain, generally of the internal pains; distinguished from smart, which is commonly used of uneasiness in the external parts; but this is no accurate account.

    To sue, and be deny'd, such common grace,
    My wounds ake at you!
    Shakesp. Timon.

            Let our finger ake, and it endues
    Our other healthful members with a sense
    Of pain.
    Shakesp. Othello.

    Were the pleasure of drinking accompanied, the very moment, with that sick stomach and aking head, which, in some men, are sure to follow, I think, no body would ever let wine touch his lips. Locke.

    His limbs must ake, with daily toils opprest,
    Ere long-wish'd night brings necessary rest.
    Prior.

  2. It is frequently applied, in an improper sense, to the heart; as, the heart akes; to imply grief or fear. Shakespeare has used it, still more licentiously, of the soul.

    Here shame dissuades him, there his fear prevails,
    And each, by turns, his aking heart assails.
    Addis. Ov. Met.

                                My soul akes
    To know when two authorities are up,
    Neither supreme, how soon confusion
    May enter.
    Shakesp. Coriolanus.

Sources: Addison, Joseph (408) · Shakespeare's Coriolanus (80) · Locke, John (269) · Shakespeare's Othello (60) · Prior, Matthew (162) · Shakespeare's Timon of Athens (32)

Attributes: Greek (126) · Verb Neuter (131)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Ake." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: January 25, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=2680.


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