A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Ice (noun)

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1038

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1038

Ice. n.s. [is, Saxon; eyse, Dutch.]

  1. Water or other liquor made solid by cold

                You are no surer, no,
    Than is the coal of fire upon the ice,
    Or hailstone in the sun.
    Shakespeare's Coriolanus.

    Thou art all ice, thy kindness freezes. Shakesp. R. III.

    If I should ask whether ice and water were two different species of things, I doubt not but I should be answered in the affirmative. Locke.

  2. Concreted sugar.

  3. To break the Ice. To make the first opening to any attempt.

          If you break the ice, and do this feat,
    Atchieve the elder, set the younger free
    For our access, whose hap shall be to have her,
    Will not so graceless be to be ingrate.
    Shakespeare.

    Thus have I broken the ice to invention, for the lively representation of floods and rivers necessary for our painters and poets. Peacham on Drawing.

    After he'd a while look'd wise,
    At last broke silence and the ice.
    Hudibras, p. iii.

Sources: Butler, Samuel (98) · Shakespeare's Coriolanus (80) · Locke, John (269) · Peacham, Henry (53) · Shakespeare's Richard III (63) · Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew (71)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Ice (noun)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: November 6, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=3682.


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