A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Attainment

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 177

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 177

Atta'inment. n.s. [from attain.]

  1. That which is attained; acquisition.

    We dispute with men that count it a great attainment to be able to talk much, and little to the purpose. Glanville's Scepsis.

    Our attainments are mean, compared with the perfection of the universe. Grew's Cosmologia Sacra, b. ii.

  2. The act or power of attaining.

    The Scripture must be sufficient to imprint in us the character of all things necessary for the attainment of eternal life. Hooker, b. v.

    Education in extent, more large, of time shorter, and of attainment more certain. Milton on Education.

    Government is an art above the attainment of an ordinary genius. South.

    If the same actions be the instruments, both of acquiring fame and procuring happiness, they would nevertheless fail in the attainment of this last end, if they proceeded from a desire of the first. Addison. Spectator, № 257.

    The great care of God for our salvation must appear in the concern he expressed for our attainment of it. Rogers.

Sources: Addison, Joseph (408) · Glanvill, Joseph (53) · Grew, Nehemiah (36) · Hooker, Richard (175) · Milton, John (449) · Rogers, John (38) · South, Robert (158) · Spectator (140)

Attributes: Noun Substantive (1269)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Attainment." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: February 15, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=3759.


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