A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Ominous

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View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1399

Óminous. adj. [from omen.]

  1. Exhibiting bad tokens of futurity; foreshewing ill; inauspicious.

    Let me be duke of Clarence;
    For Glo'ster's dukedom is ominous.
    Shakesp. Henry VI.

            Pomfret, thou bloody prison,
    Fatal and ominous to noble peers.
    Shakesp. Rich. III.

    These accidents the more rarely they happen, the more ominous are they esteemed, because they are never observed but when sad events do ensue. Hayward.

    Roving the Celtic and Iberian fields,
    He last betakes him to this ominous wood.
    Mil. Poems.

    As in the heathen worship of God, a sacrifice without an heart was accounted ominous; so in the christian worship of him, an heart without a sacrifice is worthless. South's Serm.

                  Pardon a father's tears,
    And give them to Charinus' memory;
    May they not prove as ominous to thee.
    Dryden.

  2. Exhibiting tokens good or ill.

    Though he had a good ominous name to have made a peace, nothing followed. Bacon's Henry VII.

Sources: Bacon, Francis (396) · Dryden, John (788) · Hayward, John (42) · Shakespeare's Henry VI, Part 3 (39) · Milton, John (449) · Shakespeare's Richard III (63) · South, Robert (158)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Ominous." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: November 13, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=4158.


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