A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
        Search Transcribed Entries:

Racket

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1629

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1629

Rácket. n.s. [of uncertain derivation; M. Casaubon derives it, after his custom, from ραχία, the dash of fluctuation against the shore.]

  1. An irregular clattering noise.

    That the tennis court keeper knows better than I, it is a low ebb of linen with thee, when thou keepest not racket there. Shakesp. Henry IV. p. ii.

  2. A confused talk, in burlesque language.

    Ambition hath removed her lodging, and lives the next door to faction, where they keep such a racket, that the whole parish is disturbed and every night in an uproar. Swift.

  3. [Raquette, Fr.] The instrument with which players strike the ball. Whence perhaps all the other senses.

    When we have matcht our rackets to these balls,
    We will in France play a set,
    Shall strike his father's crown into the hazard.
    Shakesp.

    The body, into which impression is made, either can yield backward or it cannot: if it can yield backward, then the impression made is a motion; as we see a stroke with a racket upon a ball, makes it fly from it. Digby on the Soul.

    He talks much of the motives to do and forbear, how they determine a reasonable man, as if he were no more than a tennis ball, to be tossed to and fro by the rackets of the second causes. Bramhall against Hobbs.

Sources: Bramhall, John (9) · Casaubon, Meric (1) · Digby, Kenelm (13) · Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 2 (72) · Shakespeare's Henry V (66) · Swift, Jonathan (306)

Attributes: No attributes defined yet for this entry.

Search for this word in: American Heritage · Cambridge · Dictionary.com · The Free Dictionary · Longman · Merriam-Webster · OneLook · Oxford Dictionaries · Vocabulary.com · Wiktionary · Wordnik

Discuss this entry in the forums.

Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Racket." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: November 16, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=4347.


Leave a Reply


Disclaimer:
johnsonsdictionaryonline.com is completely free to use. Johnson's dictionary is in the public domain, but please respect the hours of work put into this site by linking to it or crediting it. This site assumes no liability for its content or for the content of external sites linked to it, and has no warranty or guarantee concerning accuracy or availability.