A Dictionary of the English Language
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Imbibe

View Scan · View Transcription · from pages 1048, 1049

View Scan · View Transcription · from pages 1048, 1049

To Imbíbe. v.a. [imbibo, Latin; imbiber, French.]

  1. To drink in; to draw in.

    A pot of ashes will receive more hot water than cold, forasmuch as the warm water imbibeth more of the salt. Brown.

    The torrent merciless imbibes
    Commissions, perquisites, and bribes.
    Swift.

                      Illumin'd wide,
    The dewy-skirted clouds imbibe the sun.
    Thomson's Autumn.

  2. To admit into the mind.

    Those, that have imbibed this error, have extended the influence of this belief to the whole gospel, which they will not allow to contain any thing but promises. Hammond.

    It is not easy for the mind to put off those confused notions and prejudices it has imbibed from custom. Locke.

    Conversation with foreigners enlarges our minds, and sets them free from many prejudices we are ready to imbibe concerning them. Watt's Improvement of the Mind.

  3. To drench; to soak. This sense, though unusual, perhaps unexampled, is necessary in the English, unless the word imbue be adopted, which our writers seem not willing to receive.

    Metals, corroded with a little acid, turn into rust, which is an earth tasteless and indissolvable in water; and this earth, imbibed with more acid, becomes a metallick salt. Newton.

Sources: Browne, Thomas (204) · Hammond, Henry (47) · Locke, John (269) · Newton, Isaac (40) · Swift, Jonathan (306) · Thomson, James (73) · Watts, Isaac (117)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Imbibe." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: November 4, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=4501.


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