A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Lash (verb active)

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1171

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1171

To Lash. v.a. [from the noun.]

  1. To strike with any thing pliant; to scourge.

    Lucagus to lash his horses bends,
    Prone to the wheels.
    Dryden.

    Lets whip these stragglers o'er the seas again,
    Lash hence these over-weening rags of France.
    Shakesp.

    Let men out of their way lash on ever so fast, they are not all the nearer their journey's end. South's Serm.

    He charg'd the flames, and those that disobey'd
    He lash'd to duty with his sword of light.
    Dryden.

    And limping death, lash'd on by fate,
    Comes up to shorten half our date.
    Dryden's Horace.

    Stern as tutors, and as uncles hard,
    We lash the pupil, and defraud the ward.
    Dryden's Pers.

    Leaning on his lance he mounts his car,
    His fiery coursers lashing through the air.
    Garth's Ovid.

  2. To move with a sudden spring or jirk.

    The club hung round his ears, and batter'd brows;
    He falls; and lashing up his heels, his rider throws.
    Dryd.

  3. To beat; to strike with a sharp sound.

                            The winds grow high,
    Impending tempests charge the sky;
    The lightning flies, the thunder roars,
    And big waves lash the frighted shoars.
    Prior.

  4. To scourge with satire.

    Could pension'd Boileau lash in honest strain,
    Flatt'rers and bigots ev'n in Louis' reign.
    Pope's Horace.

  5. To tie any thing down to the side or mast of a ship.

Sources: Dryden, John (788) · Garth, Samuel (17) · Pope, Alexander (393) · Prior, Matthew (162) · Shakespeare's Richard III (63) · South, Robert (158)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Lash (verb active)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: November 5, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=4576.


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