A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Pander (noun)

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1445

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1445

Pánder. n.s. [This word is derived from Pandarus, the pimp in the story of Troilus and Cressida; it was therefore originally written pandar, till its etymology was forgotten.] A pimp; a male bawd; a procurer.

Let him with his cap in hand,
Like a base pander, hold the chamber door
Whilst by a slave
His fairest daughter is contaminated.
Shakesp. Hen. V.

If thou fear to strike, and to make me certain it is done, thou art the pander to her dishonour, and equally to me disloyal. Shakesp. Cymbeline.

If ever you prove false to one another, since I have taken such pains to bring you together, let all pitiful goers-between be call'd panders after my name. Shakesp. Troil. and Cressida.

Camillo was his help in this, his pander,
There is a plot against my life.
Shakesp. Wint. Tale.

The sons of happy Punks, the pander's heir,
Are privileged
To clap the first, and rule the theatre.
Dryden.

Thou hast confess'd thyself the conscious pandar
Of that pretended passion;
A single witness infamously known,
Against two persons of unquestion'd fame.
Dryden.

My obedient honesty was made
The pander to thy lust and black ambition.
Rowe.

Sources: Shakespeare's Cymbeline (73) · Dryden, John (788) · Shakespeare's Henry V (66) · Rowe, Nicholas (21) · Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida (36) · Shakespeare's Winter's Tale (43)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Pander (noun)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: November 10, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=4636.


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