A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Arch (noun)

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 154

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 154

Arch. n.s. [arcus, Lat.]

  1. Part of a circle, not more than the half.

    The mind perceives, that an arch of a circle is less than the whole circle, as clearly as it does the idea of a circle. Locke.

  2. A building in form of a segment of a circle, used for bridges and other works.

    Ne'er through an arch so hurried the blown tide,
    As the recomforted through the gates.
    Shakesp. Coriolanus.

    Let Rome in Tiber melt, and the wide arch
    Of the rais'd empire fall! here is my space.
    Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra.

    The royal squadron marches,
    Erect triumphal arches
    For Albion and Albanius.
    Dryden's Albion.

  3. The sky, or vault of heaven.

                        Hath nature given them eyes
    To see this vaulted arch, and the rich cope
    Of sea and land.
    Shakesp. Cymbeline.

  4. [from ἄρχος.] A chief: obsolete.

                    The noble duke, my master,
    My worth arch and patron comes to night.
    Sh. King. Lear.

Sources: Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra (57) · Shakespeare's Coriolanus (80) · Shakespeare's Cymbeline (73) · Dryden, John (788) · Shakespeare's King Lear (144) · Locke, John (269)

Attributes: Greek (126) · Latin (690) · Noun Substantive (1269)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Arch (noun)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: February 15, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=4796.


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