A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Kernel (noun)

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1149

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1149

Ke'rnel. n.s. [cẏꞃnl, a gland, Saxon; karne, Dutch; cerneau, French.]

  1. The edible substance contained in a shell.

                As brown in hue
    As hazle nuts, and sweeter than the kernels.
    Shakespeare.

    There can be no kernel in this light nut; the soul of this man is his clothes. Shakesp. All's well that ends well.

    The kernel of the nut serves them for bread and meat, and the shells for cups. More.

  2. Any thing included in a husk or integument.

    The kernel of a grape, the fig's small grain,
    Can cloath a mountain, and o'ershade a plain.
    Denham.

    Oats are ripe when the straw turns yellow and the kernel hard. Mortimer's Husbandry.

  3. The seeds of pulpy fruits.

    I think he will carry this island home in his pocket, and give it his son for an apple. — And sowing the kernels of it in the sea, bring forth more islands. Shakes. Tempest.

    The apple inclosed in wax was as fresh as at the first putting in, and the kernels continued white. Bacon's Nat. Hist.

  4. The central part of any thing upon which the ambient strata are concreted.

    A solid body in the bladder makes the kernel of a stone. Arb.

  5. Knobby concretions in childrens flesh.

Sources: Shakespeare's All's Well That Ends Well (21) · Arbuthnot, John (227) · Bacon, Francis (396) · Denham, John (75) · More, Henry (28) · Mortimer, John (62) · Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew (71) · Shakespeare's Tempest (50)

Attributes: Dutch (90) · French (385) · Saxon (215)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Kernel (noun)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: February 22, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=4929.


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