A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Loll (verb neuter)

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To Loll. v.n. [Of this word the etymology is not known. Perhaps it might be contemptuously derived from lollard, a name of great reproach before the reformation; of whom one tenet was, that all trades not necessary to life are unlawful.]

  1. To lean idly; to rest lazily against any thing.

    So hangs, and lolls, and weeps upon me; so shakes and pulls me. Shakespeare's Othello.

    He is not lolling on a lewd love bed,
    But on his knees at meditation.
    Shakesp. Rich. III.

    Close by a softly murm'ring stream,
    Where lovers us'd to loll and dream.
    Hudibras, p. i.

    To loll on couches, rich with cytron steds,
    And lay your guilty limbs in Tyrian beds.
    Dryden.

    Void of care he lolls supine in state,
    And leaves his business to be done by fate.
    Dryd. Pers.

    But wanton now, and lolling at our ease,
    We suffer all the invet'rate ills of peace.
    Dryden.

                        A lazy, lolling sort
    Of ever listless loit'rers.
    Dunciad, b. iv.

  2. To hang out. Used of the tongue hanging out in weariness or play.

    The triple porter of the Stygian seat,
    With lolling tongue lay fawning at thy feet.
    Dryden.

    With harmless play amidst the bowls he pass'd,
    And with his lolling tongue assay'd the taste.
    Dryden.

Sources: Butler, Samuel (98) · Dryden, John (788) · Shakespeare's Othello (60) · Pope, Alexander (393) · Shakespeare's Richard III (63)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Loll (verb neuter)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: November 5, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=5100.


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