A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Fur (verb)

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 873

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 873

To Fur. v.a. [from the noun.]

  1. To line or cover with skins that have soft hair.

    How mad a sight it was to see Dametas, like rich tissue furred with lambskins? Sidney, b. ii.

    Through tatter'd cloaths small vices do appear;
    Robes and furr'd gowns hide all.
    Shakesp. King Lear.

    You are for dreams and slumbers, brother priest;
    You fur your gloves with reasons.
    Shakes. Troil. and Cress.

  2. To cover with soft matter.

    To make lampblack, take a torch and hold it under the bottom of a latten bason; and, as it groweth to be furred and black within, strike it with a feather into some shell. Peacham.

    The sisters, mourning for their brother's loss,
    Their bodies hid in bark, and furr'd with moss.
    Dryden.

    Their frying blood compels to irrigate
    Their dry furr'd tongues.
    Phillips.

    A dungeon wide and horrible; the walls
    On all sides furr'd with mouldy damps, and hung
    With clots of ropy gore.
    Addison.

Sources: Addison, Joseph (408) · Dryden, John (788) · Shakespeare's King Lear (144) · Peacham, Henry (53) · Philips, John (42) · Sidney, Philip (140) · Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida (36)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Fur (verb)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: October 22, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=5494.


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