A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Yew

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 2312

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 2312

Yew. n.s. [ıƿ, Saxon; yw, Welsh. This is often written eugh; but the former orthography is at once nearer to the sound and the derivation. See Eugh.] A tree of tough wood.

It hath amentaceous flowers, which consist of many apices, for the most part shaped like a mushroom, and are barren; but the embryoes, which are produced at remote distances on the same tree, do afterward become hollow bell-shaped berries, which are full of juice, and include seeds somewhat like acorns, having, as it were, a little cup to each. Miller.

The shooter eugh, the broad-leav'd sycamore,
The barren plantane, and the walnut sound;
The myrrhe, that her foul sin doth still deplore,
Alder the owner of all waterish ground.
Fairfax.

            Slips of yew,
Shiver'd in the moon's eclipse.
Shakesp. Macbeth.

        They would bind me here
Unto the body of a dismal yew.
Shakesp. Titus Andronicus.

            He drew,
And almost join'd the horns of the tough yew.
Dryden.

The distinguish'd yew is ever seen,
Unchang'd his branch, and permanent his green.
Prior.

Sources: Dryden, John (788) · Fairfax, Edward (30) · Shakespeare's Macbeth (136) · Miller, Philip (58) · Prior, Matthew (162) · Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus (16)

Attributes: Noun Substantive (1269) · Saxon (215) · Welsh (Welch) (27)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Yew." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: February 16, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=6187.


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