A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Patron

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1465

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1465

Pa'tron. n.s. [patron, Fr. patronus, Latin.]

  1. One who countenances, supports or protects. Commonly a wretch who supports with insolence, and is paid with flattery.

    I'll plead for you, as for my patron. Shakesp.

    Ne'er let me pass in silence Dorset's name;
    Ne'er cease to mention the continu'd debt,
    Which the great patron only would forget.
    Prior.

  2. A guardian saint.

    Thou amongst those saints, whom thou do'st see,
    Shall be a saint, and thine own nation's friend
    And patron.
    Fairy Queen, b. i.

    St. Michael is mentioned as the patron of the Jews, and is now taken by the Christians, as the protector general of our religion. Dryden.

  3. Advocate; defender; vindicator.

    We are no patrons of those things; the best defence whereof is speedy redress and amendment. Hooker, b. ii. s. 1.

    Whether the minds of men have naturally imprinted on them the ideas of extension and number, I leave to those who are the patrons of innate principles. Locke.

  4. One who has donation of ecclesiastical preferment.

Sources: Dryden, John (788) · Hooker, Richard (175) · Locke, John (269) · Prior, Matthew (162) · Spenser, Edmund (254) · Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew (71)

Attributes: French (385) · Latin (690) · Noun Substantive (1269)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Patron." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: January 25, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=6769.


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