A Dictionary of the English Language
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Warm (adjective)

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 2243

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 2243

Warm. adj. [warm, Gothick; wearm, Sax. warm, Dutch.]

  1. Not cold, though not hot; heated to a small degree.

    He stretched himself upon the child, and the flesh of the child waxed warm. 2 Kings iv. 34.

    Main ocean flow'd, not idle, but with warm
    Prolifick humour, soft'ning all her globe.
    Milton.

  2. Zealous; ardent.

    I never thought myself so warm in any party's cause as to deserve their money. Pope.

    Scaliger in his poetics is very warm against it. Broome's Notes on the Odyssey.

  3. Violent; furious; vehement.

    Welcome day-light; we shall have warm work on't:
    The Moor will 'gage
    His utmost forces on his next assault,
    To win a queen and kingdom.
    Dryden's Spanish Friar.

  4. Busy in action.

    I hate the ling'ring summons to attend,
    Death all at once would be a nobler end;
    Fate is unkind: methinks a general
    Should warm, and at the head of armies fall.
    Dryden.

  5. Fanciful; enthusiastick.

    If there be a sober and a wise man, what difference will there be between his knowledge and that of the most extravagant fancy in the world? If there be any difference between them, the advantage will be on the warm-headed man's side, as having the more ideas, and the more lively. Locke.

Sources: The Bible - 2. Kings (12) · Broome, William (16) · Dryden, John (788) · Locke, John (269) · Milton, John (449) · Pope, Alexander (393)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Warm (adjective)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: June 27, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=6834.


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