A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Abound

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View Scan · View Transcription · from page 60

To Abo'und. v.n. [abundo, Lat. abonder, French.]

  1. To have in great plenty; used sometimes with the particle in, and sometimes the particle with.

            The king-becoming graces,
    I have no relish of them, but abound
    In the division of each several crime,
    Acting it many ways.
    Shakespeare's Macbeth.

    Corn, wine, and oil, are wanting to this ground,
    In which our countries fruitfully abound.
    Dryd. Indian Emp.

    A faithful man shall abound with blessings: but he that maketh haste to be rich, shall not be innocent. Prov. xxviii. 20.

    Now that languages are made, and abound with words, standing for such combinations, an usual way of getting these complex ideas, is by the explication of those terms that stand for them. Locke.

  2. To be in great plenty.

    And because iniquity shall abound, the love of many shall wax cold. Matthew, xxiv. 12.

    Words are like leaves, and where they most abound,
    Much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.
    Pope's Essay on Criticism.

Sources: Dryden, John (788) · Locke, John (269) · Shakespeare's Macbeth (136) · The Bible - Matthew (21) · Pope, Alexander (393) · The Bible - Proverbs (19)

Attributes: French (385) · Latin (690) · Verb Neuter (131)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Abound." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: January 26, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=743.


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