A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
        Search Transcribed Entries:

Absorbent

View Scan · View Transcription · from pages 63, 64

View Scan · View Transcription · from pages 63, 64

Abso'rbent. n.s. [absorbens, Lat.]

A medicine that, by the softness or porosity of its parts, either causes the asperities of pungent humours, or dries away superfluous moisture in the body. Quincy.

There is a third class of substances, commonly called absorbents; as, the various kinds of shells, coral, chalk, crab eyes, &c. which likewise raise an effervescence, and are therefore called alkalis, though not so properly, for they are not salts. Arbuthnot on Aliments.

Sources: Arbuthnot, John (227) · Quincy, John (60)

Attributes: Latin (690) · Noun Substantive (1269)

Search for this word in: American Heritage · Cambridge · Dictionary.com · The Free Dictionary · Longman · Merriam-Webster · OneLook · Oxford Dictionaries · Vocabulary.com · Wiktionary · Wordnik

Discuss this entry in the forums.

Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Absorbent." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: January 28, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=912.


Leave a Reply


Disclaimer:
johnsonsdictionaryonline.com is completely free to use. Johnson's dictionary is in the public domain, but please respect the hours of work put into this site by linking to it or crediting it. This site assumes no liability for its content or for the content of external sites linked to it, and has no warranty or guarantee concerning accuracy or availability.