A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Vitious

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 2149

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 2149

Vítious. adj. [vicieux, Fr. vitiosus, Latin.]

  1. Corrupt; wicked; opposite to virtuous. It is rather applied to habitual faults, than criminal actions.

                Make known
    It is no vitious blot, murder, or foulness
    That hath depriv'd me of your grace.
    Shakesp. K. Lear.

    Witness th' irreverent son
    Of him who built the ark; who, for the shame
    Done to his father, heard his heavy curse,
    'Servant of servants,' on his vitious race.
    Milton.

    Wit's what the vitious fear, the virtuous shun;
    By fools 'tis hated, and by knaves undone.
    Pope.

    No troops abroad are so ill disciplin'd as the English; which cannot well be otherwise, while the common soldiers have before their eyes the vitious example of their leaders. Swift.

  2. Corrupt; having physical ill qualities.

    When vitious language contends to be high, it is full of rock, mountain, and pointedness. B. Johnson.

    Here from the vicious air and sickly skies,
    A plague did on the dumb creation rise.
    Dryden.

Sources: Dryden, John (788) · Jonson, Ben (70) · Shakespeare's King Lear (144) · Milton, John (449) · Pope, Alexander (393) · Swift, Jonathan (306)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Vitious." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: April 18, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=9467.


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