A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Kidney

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1150

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1150

Ki'dney. n.s. [Etymology unknown.]

  1. These are two in number, one on each side: they have the same figure as kidneybeans: their length is four or five fingers, their breadth three, and their thickness two: the right is under the liver, and the left under the spleen. The use of the kidneys is to separate the urine from the blood, which, by the motion of the heart and arteries, is thrust into the emulgent branches, which carry it to the little glands, by which the serosity being separated, is received by the orifice of the little tubes, which go from the glands to the pelvis, and from thence it runs by the ureters into the bladder. Quincy.

    A youth laboured under a complication of diseases, from his mesentery and kidneys. Wiseman's Surgery.

  2. Race; kind: in ludicrous language.

    Think of that, a man of my kidney; think of that, that am as subject to heat as butter; a man of continual dissolution and thaw. Shakesp. Merry Wives of Windsor.

    There are millions in the world of this man's kidney, that take up the same resolution without noise. L'Estrange.

Sources: L'Estrange, Roger (131) · Shakespeare's Merry Wives of Windsor (95) · Quincy, John (60) · Wiseman, Richard (68)

Attributes: Noun Substantive (1269)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Kidney." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: February 22, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=9910.


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