A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Invader

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1121

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 1121

Inváder. n.s. [from invado, Latin.]

  1. One who enters with hostility into the possessions of another.

    The breath of Scotland the Spaniards could not endure; neither durst they, as invaders, land in Ireland. Bacon.

                Their piety
    In sharp contest of battle found no aid
    Against invaders.
    Milton's Paradise Lost.

    That knowledge, like the coal from the altar, serves only to embroil and consume the sacrilegious invaders. Decay of Piety.

        Were he lost, the naked empire
    Would be a prey expos'd to all invaders.
    Denham's Sophy.

    The country about Attica was the most barren of any in Greece, through which means it happened that the natives were never expelled by the fury of invaders. Swift.

    Secure, by William's care, let Britain stand;
    Nor dread the bold invader's hand.
    Prior.

    Esteem and judgment with strong fancy join,
    To call the fair invader in;
    My darling favourite inclination, too,
    All, all conspiring with the foe.
    Granville.

  2. An assailant.

  3. Encroacher; intruder.

    The substance thereof was formerly comprised in that uncompounded style, but afterwards prudently enlarged for the repelling and preventing heretical invaders. Hammond.

Sources: Allestree, Richard (89) · Bacon, Francis (396) · Denham, John (75) · Granville, George (23) · Hammond, Henry (47) · Milton, John (449) · Prior, Matthew (162) · Swift, Jonathan (306)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Invader." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: October 9, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=9920.


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