A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Broach (verb)

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 292

View Scan · View Transcription · from page 292

To Broach. v.a. [from the noun.]

  1. To spit; to pierce as with a spit.

    As by a low but loving likelihood,
    Were now the general of our gracious empress,
    As in good time he may, from Ireland coming,
    Bringing rebellion broached on his sword.
    Shakesp. Henry V.

    He felled men as one would mow hay, and sometimes broached a great number of them upon his pike, as one would carry little birds spitted upon a stick. Hakewell on Providence.

  2. To pierce a vessel in order to draw the liquour; to tap.

  3. To open any store.

    I will notably provide, that you shall want neither weapons, victuals, nor aid; I will open the old armouries, I will broach my store, and bring forth my stores. Knolles's History.

  4. To give out, or utter any thing.

    This errour, that Pison was Ganges, was first broached by Josephus. Raleigh.

    Those who were the chief instruments of raising the noise, made use of those very opinions themselves had broached, for arguments to prove, that the change of ministers was dangerous. Swift's Examiner, № 45.

  5. To let out any thing.

    And now the field of death, the lifts,
    Were enter'd by antagonists,
    And blood was ready to be broach'd,
    When Hudibras in haste approach'd.
    Hudibras, cant. ii.

Sources: Butler, Samuel (98) · Hakewill, George (9) · Shakespeare's Henry V (66) · Knolles, Richard (44) · Raleigh, Walter (68) · Swift, Jonathan (306)

Attributes: Verb Active (289)

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Cite this page: Johnson, Samuel. "Broach (verb)." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: April 15, 2014. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?p=997.


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