A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Alphabetical List of Entries

~ D ~

D, Is a consonant nearly approaching in sound to T, but formed by a stronger appulse of the tongue to the upper part of the mouth. The sound of D in English is uniform, and it is never mute.

D
Da Capo
Dab (noun)
Dab (verb)
Dab-chick
Dabble (verb active)
Dabble (verb neuter)
Dabbler
Dace
Dactyle
Dad
Daddy
Daedal
Daffodil
Daffodilly
Daffodowndilly
Daft
Dag (noun)
Dag (verb)
Dagger
Daggersdrawing
Daggle (verb active)
Daggle (verb neuter)
Daggledtail
Daily (adjective)
Daily (adverb)
Daintily
Daintiness
Dainty (adjective)
Dainty (noun)
Dairy
Dairymaid
Daisy
Dale
Dalliance
Dallier
Dallop
Dally (verb active)
Dally (verb neuter)
Damn
Damnable
Dandle
Dandler
Dandruff
Danewort
Danger (noun)
Danger (verb)
Dar
Dart (noun 1)
Dart (noun 2)
 Daw
Death
Deaurate
Deauration
Debacchation
Debarb
Debt
Debtor
Debullition
Decacuminated
Decade
December
Dedecorate
Dedecoration
Deem (noun)
Deem (verb)
Defailance
Defalcate
Defalcation
Defalk
Defective
Defective Nouns
Defective Verb
Deficient
Deficient Nouns
Deficient Numbers
Deficient Verbs
Defile (noun)
Defile (verb active)
Defile (verb neuter)
Defilement
Defiler
Delf
Delfe
Delicate
Democracy
Demonocracy
Dendrology
Depauperate
Desiderate
Dew (noun)
Dewbesprent
Diaeresis
Diagram
Dialect
Diamond
Dictionary
Didder
Dingle
Dis
 Discretion
Discretive
Discriminate
Discrimination
Discursive
Distain
Distrain (verb active)
Distrain (verb neuter)
Distrainer
Distraint
Distress (noun)
Distress (verb)
Distressful
Do (verb active)
Doctor (noun)
Dodecatemorion
Doll
Dominator
Doodle
Door
Dove
Down (adverb)
Draw (verb active)
Dray
Draycart
Dread (adjective)
Dread (noun)
Dread (verb active)
Dread (verb neuter)
Drift (noun)
Drift (verb)
Drive (verb active)
Drive (verb neuter)
Dromedary
Drop (noun)
Drum (noun)
Drum (verb)
Dry (adjective)
Dry (verb active)
Dry (verb neuter)
Dubitable
Dubitation
Due (adjective)
Dulcify
Dyscrasy
Dysentery
Dyspepsy
Dysphony
Dyspnoea
Dysury

Cite this page: "Alphabetical List of Entries." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: December 6, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?page_id=50.


  1. Wonderful, keep up the good work!

  2. Mike Nightingale on November 18th, 2011 at 11:24 am
  3. Can I help?

  4. Julian Talamantez Brolaski on January 19th, 2012 at 9:33 pm
  5. Proofreading is a big help. If you notice a transcription error, please contact me.

  6. Brandi on January 20th, 2012 at 6:20 am
  7. If time permits, can the words regulate, rule and commerce be added soon? It would be most helpful. Those that discuss the Constitution often reference Johnsons. Thank you.

  8. EE Johnson on February 7th, 2012 at 7:27 am
  9. Brandi on February 7th, 2012 at 8:31 am
  10. I am researching the life of George Ord (1781-1886) of Philadelphia, who is said to have contributed many entries to Johnson’s expanded dictionary (as well as Noah Webster’s first dictionary).

    How may I find out which and how many entries he provided to Johnson’s dictionary.

    Thanks in advance for any help you might provide.

  11. Al Dorof on March 10th, 2012 at 4:39 pm
  12. Al,

    Johnson died in 1784, when Ord was only 3 years old. Any entries linked to Ord which appeared in “Johnson” dictionaries would have been added by later lexicographers (many of whom linked the title of their dictionary to Johnson merely for marketing purposes). I focus on the original dictionary Johnson produced, so I do not know much about post-Johnson additions.

    I was going to suggest looking at the online OED, but I tried searching for George Ord there myself and was unable to find any contributions or sources linked to Ord.

    Sorry that I’m unable to provide any further assistance.

  13. Brandi on March 10th, 2012 at 4:56 pm
  14. Would you be able to transcribe “Indubitable”?

  15. Amanda Patchin on April 18th, 2012 at 10:34 am
  16. There is a transcription error in the second sentence under the letter “h”. It should read: ‘the h in English is scarcely “ever” mute’; not “every”
    Thanks.

  17. Felicia Agyepong on July 12th, 2012 at 4:39 pm
  18. Thanks for catching that. It has been fixed both on the “H” entry page and on the alphabet page.

  19. Brandi on July 13th, 2012 at 6:27 am
  20. trouble is it takes half an hour to find a word if not yet transcribed, since if you want ‘time’ you go to ‘T’ and then have to turn some 50 pages, one at a time, to get to to ‘time’. Why not allow one to select a page by number?

  21. Mark on October 25th, 2012 at 1:44 am
  22. Mark,

    go to “Page View.” Under the title “Page View” and above the image and page number are two drop-down boxes – “Select Section” and “Select Page”. If you wanted to find “time,” for instance, you would select “T” from the first box. This causes the “Select Page” box to be filled in with the pages from the “T” section, enabling you to select “Tillyfally – Time.” Press the “Go” button and that page is loaded.

  23. Brandi on October 25th, 2012 at 8:23 am
  24. Do you have a definition of “arms” as in weaponry? This also is significant in interpreting the constitution.

  25. Misha Dennis on November 23rd, 2012 at 1:07 am
  26. Here it is, newly transcribed from page 159: Arms

  27. Brandi on November 23rd, 2012 at 5:42 pm
  28. I wonder is there was a definition for ‘people’ as in The People…did Johnson define that?

  29. Marco Dz on January 17th, 2013 at 1:24 pm
  30. The first of the five definitions under “People (noun)” is “A nation; these who compose a community,” which includes an illustrative quotation from Shakespeare’s Coriolanus: “What is the city but the people? / True the people are the city.” The entry can be found here.

  31. Brandi on January 17th, 2013 at 1:58 pm
  32. Hi, I was searching for one of the most used words in the 18th century: Nature, but it isn’t here. Can it be added?

  33. Deepali on March 20th, 2013 at 8:53 am
  34. Brandi on March 20th, 2013 at 12:10 pm

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