A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Alphabetical List of Entries

~ G ~

G has two sounds, one from the Greek Γ, and the Latin, which is called that of the hard G, because it is formed by a pressure somewhat hard of the forepart of the tongue against the upper gum. This sound G retains before a, o, u, l, r; as, gate, go, gull. The other sound, called that of the soft G, resembles that of J, and is commonly, though not always, found before e, i; as, gem, gibbet. Before u, at the end of a word, g is commonly melted away; as in the French, from which these words are commonly derived: thus, for benign, malign, condign, we pronounce benine, maline, condine. It is often silent in the middle of words before h; as, might. The Saxon G, ʒ, seems to have had generally the sound y consonant; whence gate is by rusticks still pronounced yate.

G
Gabardine
Gabble (noun)
Gabble (verb)
Gabbler
Gabel
Gabion
Gable
Gad (noun)
Gad (verb)
Gadder
Gaddingly
Gadfly
Gaff
Gaffer
Gaffles
Gag (noun)
Gag (verb)
Gage (noun)
Gage (verb)
Gaggle
Gaiety
Gaily
Gain (adjective)
Gain (noun)
Gain (verb active)
Gain (verb neuter 1)
Gain (verb neuter 2)
Gainer
Gainful
Gainfully
Gainfulness
Galaxy
Gall (noun)
Gall (verb active)
Galligaskins
Gallow (noun)
Gallow (verb)
Galloway
Gallowglasses
Gallows
Gammer
Gamut
Gang (noun)
Gang (verb)
Gaol
Garden
Gargarism
Gargarize
Garrison (noun)
Garrison (verb)
Gauge (verb)
Gay (adjective)
Gay (noun)
Gayety
Gayly
Gayness
Geason
Geat
 Geck (noun)
Geck (verb)
Gee
Geese
Gelable
Gelatine
Gelatinous
Geld
Gelder
Gelder-rose
Gelding
Gelid
Gelidity
Gelidness
Gelly
Gemelliparous
General (adjective)
Geoponicks
Gewgaw (adjective)
Gewgaw (noun)
Gherkin
Ghess
Ghost (noun)
Gibbe
Gibbet (noun)
Gibbet (verb)
Gibbier
Gibbosity
Gibbous
Gibbousness
Gibcat
Gibe (noun)
Gibe (verb active)
Gibe (verb neuter)
Giber
Gibingly
Giblets
Giddily
Giddiness
Giddy
Giddybrained
Gipsy
Girasole
Gird (noun)
Gird (verb active)
Gird (verb neuter)
Girder
Gisle
Gith
Give (verb active)
Glabrity
Gladiator
Glance (noun)
Glass (adjective)
Glass (noun)
Glass (verb)
Gleek (noun)
Gleek (verb)
Glory (noun)
 Glory (verb)
Go
Go-cart
Goad (noun)
Goad (verb)
Gold
Gome
Gomphosis
Gondola
Gonorrhoea
Goose
Gore (noun)
Gore (verb)
Gorgeous
Gorgon
Gormand
Gormandize
Gormandizer
Gorse
Gory
Gradient
Gramineous
Graminivorous
Grammar
Grammar School
Grammaticaster
Grand
Grandevity
Grandevous
Grange
Great (adjective)
Great (noun)
Green (adjective)
Griffin
Griffon
Grubstreet
Grudge (verb active)
Grutch (verb)
Gry
Guard (noun)
Guard (verb active)
Guard (verb neuter)
Guess (noun)
Guess (verb active 1)
Guess (verb active 2)
Guggle
Guinea
Gulosity
Gurgle
Gybe (verb)
Gymnastically
Gymnastick
Gymnick
Gymnospermous
Gynecocrasay
Gyration
Gyre
Gyve
Gyves

Cite this page: "Alphabetical List of Entries." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: December 6, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?page_id=50.


  1. Wonderful, keep up the good work!

  2. Mike Nightingale on November 18th, 2011 at 11:24 am
  3. Can I help?

  4. Julian Talamantez Brolaski on January 19th, 2012 at 9:33 pm
  5. Proofreading is a big help. If you notice a transcription error, please contact me.

  6. Brandi on January 20th, 2012 at 6:20 am
  7. If time permits, can the words regulate, rule and commerce be added soon? It would be most helpful. Those that discuss the Constitution often reference Johnsons. Thank you.

  8. EE Johnson on February 7th, 2012 at 7:27 am
  9. Brandi on February 7th, 2012 at 8:31 am
  10. I am researching the life of George Ord (1781-1886) of Philadelphia, who is said to have contributed many entries to Johnson’s expanded dictionary (as well as Noah Webster’s first dictionary).

    How may I find out which and how many entries he provided to Johnson’s dictionary.

    Thanks in advance for any help you might provide.

  11. Al Dorof on March 10th, 2012 at 4:39 pm
  12. Al,

    Johnson died in 1784, when Ord was only 3 years old. Any entries linked to Ord which appeared in “Johnson” dictionaries would have been added by later lexicographers (many of whom linked the title of their dictionary to Johnson merely for marketing purposes). I focus on the original dictionary Johnson produced, so I do not know much about post-Johnson additions.

    I was going to suggest looking at the online OED, but I tried searching for George Ord there myself and was unable to find any contributions or sources linked to Ord.

    Sorry that I’m unable to provide any further assistance.

  13. Brandi on March 10th, 2012 at 4:56 pm
  14. Would you be able to transcribe “Indubitable”?

  15. Amanda Patchin on April 18th, 2012 at 10:34 am
  16. There is a transcription error in the second sentence under the letter “h”. It should read: ‘the h in English is scarcely “ever” mute’; not “every”
    Thanks.

  17. Felicia Agyepong on July 12th, 2012 at 4:39 pm
  18. Thanks for catching that. It has been fixed both on the “H” entry page and on the alphabet page.

  19. Brandi on July 13th, 2012 at 6:27 am
  20. trouble is it takes half an hour to find a word if not yet transcribed, since if you want ‘time’ you go to ‘T’ and then have to turn some 50 pages, one at a time, to get to to ‘time’. Why not allow one to select a page by number?

  21. Mark on October 25th, 2012 at 1:44 am
  22. Mark,

    go to “Page View.” Under the title “Page View” and above the image and page number are two drop-down boxes – “Select Section” and “Select Page”. If you wanted to find “time,” for instance, you would select “T” from the first box. This causes the “Select Page” box to be filled in with the pages from the “T” section, enabling you to select “Tillyfally – Time.” Press the “Go” button and that page is loaded.

  23. Brandi on October 25th, 2012 at 8:23 am
  24. Do you have a definition of “arms” as in weaponry? This also is significant in interpreting the constitution.

  25. Misha Dennis on November 23rd, 2012 at 1:07 am
  26. Here it is, newly transcribed from page 159: Arms

  27. Brandi on November 23rd, 2012 at 5:42 pm
  28. I wonder is there was a definition for ‘people’ as in The People…did Johnson define that?

  29. Marco Dz on January 17th, 2013 at 1:24 pm
  30. The first of the five definitions under “People (noun)” is “A nation; these who compose a community,” which includes an illustrative quotation from Shakespeare’s Coriolanus: “What is the city but the people? / True the people are the city.” The entry can be found here.

  31. Brandi on January 17th, 2013 at 1:58 pm
  32. Hi, I was searching for one of the most used words in the 18th century: Nature, but it isn’t here. Can it be added?

  33. Deepali on March 20th, 2013 at 8:53 am
  34. Brandi on March 20th, 2013 at 12:10 pm

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