A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
        Help us transcribe the dictionary! · Search Transcribed Entries:
ADVERTISEMENT

 

Alphabetical List of Entries

~ H ~

H Is in English, as in other languages, a note of aspiration, sounded only by a strong emission of the breath, without any conformation of the organs of speech, and is therefore by many grammarians accounted no letter. The h in English is scarcely ever mute at the beginning of a word, or where it immediately precedes a vowel; as house, behaviour: where it is followed by a consonant it has no sound, according to the present pronunciation: but anciently, as now in Scotland, it made the syllable guttural; as right, bought.

H
Ha
Haak
Habeas Corpus
Haberdasher
Haberdine
Habergeon
Habiliment
Habilitate
Habilitation
Hability
Habit (noun)
Habit (verb)
Habitable
Habitableness
Habitance
Habitant
Habitation
Habitator
Habitual
Habitually
Habituate
Habitude
Habnab
Hack (verb active)
Hack (verb neuter)
Hackle (noun)
Hackle (verb)
Hackney (noun)
Hackney (verb)
Hacqueton
Had
Haddock
Haft (noun)
Haggle (verb neuter)
Hagiographer
Hah
Hair
Hairbel
Hairbrained
Hairbreadth
Haircloth
Hairiness
Hairlace
Hairless
Hairy
Hake
Hakot
Hal
Halberd
Hale (verb)
Half-scholar
 Hallelujah
Halloo (interjection)
Halloo (verb neuter)
Hand (noun)
Handsome (adjective)
Handsome (verb)
Handsomely
Handsomeness
Handvice
Handwriting
Handy
Handydandy
Hang (verb active)
Hang (verb neuter)
Hap
Happiness
Happy
Harass (noun)
Harass (verb)
Hare (noun)
Hare (verb)
Harebrained
Have
Head (noun)
Heart-Peas
Heave (noun)
Heave (verb active)
Heave (verb neuter)
Heave Offering
Heavily
Heaviness
Heavy (adjective)
Heavy (adverb)
Hebdomad
Hebdomadal
Hebdomadary
Hebetate
Hebetation
Hebetude
Hebraism
Hebraist
Hebrician
Hecatomb
Hectical
Hectick (adjective)
Hectick (noun)
Hector (noun)
Hector (verb active)
Helix
Helminthick
Here
Heresiarch
 Heterogeneous
Heteroscians
Hexagon
Hexapod
Hexastick
Heydegives
Hiation
Hiccius Doccius
Higgle
Higgledy-piggeldy
Higgler
Historian
Historify
History
History Piece
Hog
Hogshead
Hold (1)
Hold (verb active)
Hook (noun)
Horse (noun)
Horticulture
Hotchpotch
House (noun)
Houseleek
Hove
Hoven
Huff (noun)
Humect
Humectate
Hyacinth
Hyper
Hyperbola
Hyperbole
Hyperbolical
Hyperbolically
Hyperbolick
Hyperboliform
Hyperborean
Hypercritical
Hypercritick
Hypermeter
Hypersarcosis
Hyphen
Hypnotick
Hypochondres
Hypochondriacal
Hypochondriack
Hysterical
Hysterick
Hystericks

Cite this page: "Alphabetical List of Entries." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: December 6, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?page_id=50.


  1. Wonderful, keep up the good work!

  2. Mike Nightingale on November 18th, 2011 at 11:24 am
  3. Can I help?

  4. Julian Talamantez Brolaski on January 19th, 2012 at 9:33 pm
  5. Proofreading is a big help. If you notice a transcription error, please contact me.

  6. Brandi on January 20th, 2012 at 6:20 am
  7. If time permits, can the words regulate, rule and commerce be added soon? It would be most helpful. Those that discuss the Constitution often reference Johnsons. Thank you.

  8. EE Johnson on February 7th, 2012 at 7:27 am
  9. Brandi on February 7th, 2012 at 8:31 am
  10. I am researching the life of George Ord (1781-1886) of Philadelphia, who is said to have contributed many entries to Johnson’s expanded dictionary (as well as Noah Webster’s first dictionary).

    How may I find out which and how many entries he provided to Johnson’s dictionary.

    Thanks in advance for any help you might provide.

  11. Al Dorof on March 10th, 2012 at 4:39 pm
  12. Al,

    Johnson died in 1784, when Ord was only 3 years old. Any entries linked to Ord which appeared in “Johnson” dictionaries would have been added by later lexicographers (many of whom linked the title of their dictionary to Johnson merely for marketing purposes). I focus on the original dictionary Johnson produced, so I do not know much about post-Johnson additions.

    I was going to suggest looking at the online OED, but I tried searching for George Ord there myself and was unable to find any contributions or sources linked to Ord.

    Sorry that I’m unable to provide any further assistance.

  13. Brandi on March 10th, 2012 at 4:56 pm
  14. Would you be able to transcribe “Indubitable”?

  15. Amanda Patchin on April 18th, 2012 at 10:34 am
  16. There is a transcription error in the second sentence under the letter “h”. It should read: ‘the h in English is scarcely “ever” mute’; not “every”
    Thanks.

  17. Felicia Agyepong on July 12th, 2012 at 4:39 pm
  18. Thanks for catching that. It has been fixed both on the “H” entry page and on the alphabet page.

  19. Brandi on July 13th, 2012 at 6:27 am
  20. trouble is it takes half an hour to find a word if not yet transcribed, since if you want ‘time’ you go to ‘T’ and then have to turn some 50 pages, one at a time, to get to to ‘time’. Why not allow one to select a page by number?

  21. Mark on October 25th, 2012 at 1:44 am
  22. Mark,

    go to “Page View.” Under the title “Page View” and above the image and page number are two drop-down boxes – “Select Section” and “Select Page”. If you wanted to find “time,” for instance, you would select “T” from the first box. This causes the “Select Page” box to be filled in with the pages from the “T” section, enabling you to select “Tillyfally – Time.” Press the “Go” button and that page is loaded.

  23. Brandi on October 25th, 2012 at 8:23 am
  24. Do you have a definition of “arms” as in weaponry? This also is significant in interpreting the constitution.

  25. Misha Dennis on November 23rd, 2012 at 1:07 am
  26. Here it is, newly transcribed from page 159: Arms

  27. Brandi on November 23rd, 2012 at 5:42 pm
  28. I wonder is there was a definition for ‘people’ as in The People…did Johnson define that?

  29. Marco Dz on January 17th, 2013 at 1:24 pm
  30. The first of the five definitions under “People (noun)” is “A nation; these who compose a community,” which includes an illustrative quotation from Shakespeare’s Coriolanus: “What is the city but the people? / True the people are the city.” The entry can be found here.

  31. Brandi on January 17th, 2013 at 1:58 pm
  32. Hi, I was searching for one of the most used words in the 18th century: Nature, but it isn’t here. Can it be added?

  33. Deepali on March 20th, 2013 at 8:53 am
  34. Brandi on March 20th, 2013 at 12:10 pm

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Comment:

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Disclaimer:
johnsonsdictionaryonline.com is completely free to use. Johnson's dictionary is in the public domain, but please respect the hours of work put into this site by linking to it or crediting it. This site assumes no liability for its content or for the content of external sites linked to it, and has no warranty or guarantee concerning accuracy or availability.