A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Alphabetical List of Entries

~ O ~

O Has in English a long sound; as, drone, groan, stone, alone, cloke, broke, coal, droll; or short, got, knot, shot, prong, long. It is usually denoted long by a servile a subjoined; as, moan, or by e at the end of the syllable; as, bone: when these vowels are not appended, it is generally short, except before ll; as, droll, scroll, and even then sometimes short; as, loll.

  1. O is used as an interjection of wishing or exclamation.

    O that we, who have resisted all the designs of his love,
    would now try to defeat that of his anger!
    Decay of Piety.

    O! were he present, that his eyes and hands
    Might see, and urge, the death which he commands.
    Dryd.
  2. O is used with no great elegance by Shakespeare for a circle or oval.

                Can this cockpit hold
    The vasty field of France? or may we cram
    Within this wooden O, the very casks
    That did affright the air at Agincourt?
    Shakesp.
O
Oaf
Oafish
Oafishness
Oak
Oak (evergreen)
Oakapple
Oaken
Oakenpin
Oakum
Oar (noun)
Oar (verb active)
Oar (verb neuter)
Oary
Oast
Oatcake
Oaten
Oats
Obeisance
Obelisk
Obequitation
Oberration
Obese
Oblectation
Obliteration
Oblivious
Obmutescence
Observatory
Obstetrication
Obstetrick
Obstipation
Obstreperous
Obstreperously
Obstreperousness
Obstriction
Obstupefaction
Obstupefactive
Occecation
Odontalgick
 Oe
Oglio
Old
Oligarchy
Olitory
Ombre
Omega
Omelet
Omen
Omened
Omentum
Omer
Ominate
Omination
Ominous
Ominously
Ominousness
Omission
Omit
Omittance
Omnifarious
Omniferous
Omnifick
Omniform
Omnigenous
Omnipotence
Omnipotency
Omnipotent
Omnipresence
Omnipresent
Omniscience
Omnisciency
Omniscient
Omniscious
Omnivorous
Omoplate
Omphaloptick
One (adjective)
 Oneirocritical
Oneirocritick
Onerary
Onion
Onomancy
Onycha
Opera
Opiate (noun)
Opprobrious
Opsimathy
Optative
Orange
Orbity
Orc
Orchal
Orchanet
Orchard
Orchestre
Orrery
Oscitancy
Oscitant
Oscitation
Ostrich
Other
Ought (noun)
Ought (verb)
Owe
Own (noun)
Own (verb)
Oxymoron
Oxyrrhodine
Oyer
Oyes
Oylethole
Oyster
Oysterwench
Oysterwoman
Ozaena

Cite this page: "Alphabetical List of Entries." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: December 6, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?page_id=50.


  1. Wonderful, keep up the good work!

  2. Mike Nightingale on November 18th, 2011 at 11:24 am
  3. Can I help?

  4. Julian Talamantez Brolaski on January 19th, 2012 at 9:33 pm
  5. Proofreading is a big help. If you notice a transcription error, please contact me.

  6. Brandi on January 20th, 2012 at 6:20 am
  7. If time permits, can the words regulate, rule and commerce be added soon? It would be most helpful. Those that discuss the Constitution often reference Johnsons. Thank you.

  8. EE Johnson on February 7th, 2012 at 7:27 am
  9. Brandi on February 7th, 2012 at 8:31 am
  10. I am researching the life of George Ord (1781-1886) of Philadelphia, who is said to have contributed many entries to Johnson’s expanded dictionary (as well as Noah Webster’s first dictionary).

    How may I find out which and how many entries he provided to Johnson’s dictionary.

    Thanks in advance for any help you might provide.

  11. Al Dorof on March 10th, 2012 at 4:39 pm
  12. Al,

    Johnson died in 1784, when Ord was only 3 years old. Any entries linked to Ord which appeared in “Johnson” dictionaries would have been added by later lexicographers (many of whom linked the title of their dictionary to Johnson merely for marketing purposes). I focus on the original dictionary Johnson produced, so I do not know much about post-Johnson additions.

    I was going to suggest looking at the online OED, but I tried searching for George Ord there myself and was unable to find any contributions or sources linked to Ord.

    Sorry that I’m unable to provide any further assistance.

  13. Brandi on March 10th, 2012 at 4:56 pm
  14. Would you be able to transcribe “Indubitable”?

  15. Amanda Patchin on April 18th, 2012 at 10:34 am
  16. There is a transcription error in the second sentence under the letter “h”. It should read: ‘the h in English is scarcely “ever” mute’; not “every”
    Thanks.

  17. Felicia Agyepong on July 12th, 2012 at 4:39 pm
  18. Thanks for catching that. It has been fixed both on the “H” entry page and on the alphabet page.

  19. Brandi on July 13th, 2012 at 6:27 am
  20. trouble is it takes half an hour to find a word if not yet transcribed, since if you want ‘time’ you go to ‘T’ and then have to turn some 50 pages, one at a time, to get to to ‘time’. Why not allow one to select a page by number?

  21. Mark on October 25th, 2012 at 1:44 am
  22. Mark,

    go to “Page View.” Under the title “Page View” and above the image and page number are two drop-down boxes – “Select Section” and “Select Page”. If you wanted to find “time,” for instance, you would select “T” from the first box. This causes the “Select Page” box to be filled in with the pages from the “T” section, enabling you to select “Tillyfally – Time.” Press the “Go” button and that page is loaded.

  23. Brandi on October 25th, 2012 at 8:23 am
  24. Do you have a definition of “arms” as in weaponry? This also is significant in interpreting the constitution.

  25. Misha Dennis on November 23rd, 2012 at 1:07 am
  26. Here it is, newly transcribed from page 159: Arms

  27. Brandi on November 23rd, 2012 at 5:42 pm
  28. I wonder is there was a definition for ‘people’ as in The People…did Johnson define that?

  29. Marco Dz on January 17th, 2013 at 1:24 pm
  30. The first of the five definitions under “People (noun)” is “A nation; these who compose a community,” which includes an illustrative quotation from Shakespeare’s Coriolanus: “What is the city but the people? / True the people are the city.” The entry can be found here.

  31. Brandi on January 17th, 2013 at 1:58 pm
  32. Hi, I was searching for one of the most used words in the 18th century: Nature, but it isn’t here. Can it be added?

  33. Deepali on March 20th, 2013 at 8:53 am
  34. Brandi on March 20th, 2013 at 12:10 pm

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