A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Alphabetical List of Entries

~ P ~

P Is a labial consonant, formed by a slight compression of the anterior part of the lips; as, pull, pelt. It is confounded by the Germans and Welsh with b: it has an uniform sound: it is sometimes mute before t; as, accompt, receipt; but the mute p is in modern orthography commonly omitted.

P
Pabular
Pabulation
Pabulous
Pace (noun)
Pace (verb neuter)
Paean
Paint (noun)
Paint (verb active)
Paint (verb neuter)
Painter
Painting
Palm (noun)
Palpable
Pander (noun)
Pander (verb)
Papilionaceous
Papillary
Papillous
Papist
Papistical
Papistry
Pappous
Pappy
Par
Parable (adjective)
Parable (noun)
Parabola
Parabolical
Parabolically
Parabolick
Parabolism
Paraboloid
Paracentesis
Paracentrical
Paracentrick
Parade
Paradigm
Paradise
Paradisiacal
Paradox
Paradoxical
Paradoxically
Paraphernalia
Passive
Pastern
Pastil
Patefaction
Paten
Patent (adjective)
Pathognomonick
Patron
Pauciloquy
Pauper
Pea
Peak (noun)
Pear
Peccadillo
Peculate
Peculation
Peculiar (adjective)
Peculiar (noun)
Pedantry
Peddle
Pederero
Pedestrious
Peevish
Pelf
 Penniless
Penny
Pentachord
People (noun)
Pepasticks
Perfidious
Perfunctorily
Perfunctory
Perspicacity
Perturbatour
Perverse
Pestle
Phaenomenon
Phagedena
Phagedenick
Phagedenous
Phenicopter
Phenix
Phial
Philanthropy
Philippick
Philomot
Philosopheme
Philosophy
Piccage
Pickeer
Pie
Piece (noun)
Pigeon
Pight
Pigsney
Pilosity
Pimping
Pimple
Pineapple
Piqueer
Piqueerer
Piracy
Pirate (noun)
Pirate (verb active)
Pirate (verb neuter)
Piratical
Pish (interjection)
Pish (verb)
Pismire
Piss (noun)
Piss (verb)
Pissabed
Pissburnt
Pit (noun)
Pitch (noun)
Pitch (verb active)
Pitch (verb neuter)
Plash (noun)
Plash (verb)
Plashy
Plentiful
Plentifully
Plentifulness
Plenty
Pleonasm
Plesh
Plethora
Plethoretick
Plethorick
Plethory
Politicks
 Poltron
Poly (noun)
Poly (prefix)
Polyacoustick
Polyglot
Polygon
Polypody
Polypus
Ponk
Pontage
Ponton
Pony
Portmanteau
Posset (noun)
Postulatum
Power
Prevaricate
Prick (noun)
Prim (adjective)
Prim (verb)
Primate
Primogeniture
Primordial (adjective)
Primordial (noun)
Princock
Princox
Prink
Print (verb active)
Privacy
Privado
Private (adjective)
Private (noun)
Privateer (noun)
Privateer (verb)
Probable
Procrastinate (verb active)
Procrastinate (verb neuter)
Procrastination
Procrastinator
Protest (verb neuter)
Proximity
Prudent
Pseudo
Pseudography
Pseudology
Pshaw
Ptisan
Ptyalism
Ptysmagogue
Puberty
Pudding
Pun (noun)
Pun (verb)
Pus
Pyramid
Pyramidal
Pyramidical
Pyramidically
Pyramis
Pyre
Pyrites
Pyromancy
Pyrotechnical
Pyrotechnicks
Pyrotechny
Pyrrhonism
Pyx

Cite this page: "Alphabetical List of Entries." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: December 6, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?page_id=50.


  1. Wonderful, keep up the good work!

  2. Mike Nightingale on November 18th, 2011 at 11:24 am
  3. Can I help?

  4. Julian Talamantez Brolaski on January 19th, 2012 at 9:33 pm
  5. Proofreading is a big help. If you notice a transcription error, please contact me.

  6. Brandi on January 20th, 2012 at 6:20 am
  7. If time permits, can the words regulate, rule and commerce be added soon? It would be most helpful. Those that discuss the Constitution often reference Johnsons. Thank you.

  8. EE Johnson on February 7th, 2012 at 7:27 am
  9. Brandi on February 7th, 2012 at 8:31 am
  10. I am researching the life of George Ord (1781-1886) of Philadelphia, who is said to have contributed many entries to Johnson’s expanded dictionary (as well as Noah Webster’s first dictionary).

    How may I find out which and how many entries he provided to Johnson’s dictionary.

    Thanks in advance for any help you might provide.

  11. Al Dorof on March 10th, 2012 at 4:39 pm
  12. Al,

    Johnson died in 1784, when Ord was only 3 years old. Any entries linked to Ord which appeared in “Johnson” dictionaries would have been added by later lexicographers (many of whom linked the title of their dictionary to Johnson merely for marketing purposes). I focus on the original dictionary Johnson produced, so I do not know much about post-Johnson additions.

    I was going to suggest looking at the online OED, but I tried searching for George Ord there myself and was unable to find any contributions or sources linked to Ord.

    Sorry that I’m unable to provide any further assistance.

  13. Brandi on March 10th, 2012 at 4:56 pm
  14. Would you be able to transcribe “Indubitable”?

  15. Amanda Patchin on April 18th, 2012 at 10:34 am
  16. There is a transcription error in the second sentence under the letter “h”. It should read: ‘the h in English is scarcely “ever” mute’; not “every”
    Thanks.

  17. Felicia Agyepong on July 12th, 2012 at 4:39 pm
  18. Thanks for catching that. It has been fixed both on the “H” entry page and on the alphabet page.

  19. Brandi on July 13th, 2012 at 6:27 am
  20. trouble is it takes half an hour to find a word if not yet transcribed, since if you want ‘time’ you go to ‘T’ and then have to turn some 50 pages, one at a time, to get to to ‘time’. Why not allow one to select a page by number?

  21. Mark on October 25th, 2012 at 1:44 am
  22. Mark,

    go to “Page View.” Under the title “Page View” and above the image and page number are two drop-down boxes – “Select Section” and “Select Page”. If you wanted to find “time,” for instance, you would select “T” from the first box. This causes the “Select Page” box to be filled in with the pages from the “T” section, enabling you to select “Tillyfally – Time.” Press the “Go” button and that page is loaded.

  23. Brandi on October 25th, 2012 at 8:23 am
  24. Do you have a definition of “arms” as in weaponry? This also is significant in interpreting the constitution.

  25. Misha Dennis on November 23rd, 2012 at 1:07 am
  26. Here it is, newly transcribed from page 159: Arms

  27. Brandi on November 23rd, 2012 at 5:42 pm
  28. I wonder is there was a definition for ‘people’ as in The People…did Johnson define that?

  29. Marco Dz on January 17th, 2013 at 1:24 pm
  30. The first of the five definitions under “People (noun)” is “A nation; these who compose a community,” which includes an illustrative quotation from Shakespeare’s Coriolanus: “What is the city but the people? / True the people are the city.” The entry can be found here.

  31. Brandi on January 17th, 2013 at 1:58 pm
  32. Hi, I was searching for one of the most used words in the 18th century: Nature, but it isn’t here. Can it be added?

  33. Deepali on March 20th, 2013 at 8:53 am
  34. Brandi on March 20th, 2013 at 12:10 pm

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