A Dictionary of the English Language
                        A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson
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Alphabetical List of Entries

~ U/V ~

V, Has two powers, expressed in modern English by two characters, V consonant and U vowel, which ought to be considered as two letters; but as they were long confounded while the two uses were annexed to one form, the old custom still continues to be followed.

U, the vowel, has two sounds; one clear, expressed at other times by eu, as obtuse; the other close, and approaching to the Italian u, or English oo, as obtund.

V, the consonant, has a sound nearly approaching to those of b and f. With b it is by the Spaniards and Gascons always confounded, and in the Runick alphabet is expressed by the same character with f, distinguished only by a diacritical point. Its sound in English is uniform. It is never mute.

Umber
Umbered
Umbilical
Umbles
Umbo
Umbrage
Un
Unabashed
Unable
Unabolished
Unacceptable
Unacceptableness
Unaccepted
Unaccessibleness
Unaccommodated
Unaccompanied
Unaccomplished
Unaccountable
Unbenign
Unbent
Unbeseeming
Unbesought
Unbestowed
Unbetrayed
Unbewailed
Unbuckle
Unbuild
Unpredict
Unpreferred
Unpregnant
Unprejudicate
Unquick
Unquickened
Unrepining
Unrequested
Up (adverb)
Up (preposition)
Utmost (noun)
Utter (adjective)
Utter (verb)
Utterable
Utterance
Utterer
Utterly
Uttermost (adjective)
Uttermost (noun)
Uveous
Uvula
Uxorious
Uxoriously
Uxoriousness
V
Vacancy
Vacant
Vacate
 Vacation
Vaccary
Vacillancy
Vacillation
Vacuation
Vacuist
Vacuity
Vacuous
Vacuum
Vade
Vagabond (adjective)
Vagabond (noun)
Vagary
Vaginopennous
Vagous
Vagrancy
Vagrant (adjective)
Vagrant (noun)
Vague
Vail (noun)
Vail (verb active 1)
Vail (verb active 2)
Vail (verb neuter)
Vain
Vainglorious
Vainglory
Vainly
Vainness
Vaivode
Valance (noun)
Valance (verb)
Vale
Valediction
Valedictory
Valentine
Valerian
Valet
Valetudinarian
Valetudinary
Valiance
Valiant
Valiantly
Valiantness
Valid
Vamp (noun)
Vamp (verb)
Vamper
Van
Vancourier
Vane
Vanguard
Vection
Vectitation
Veil (noun)
 Veil (verb)
Velleity
Vice (noun)
Vicissitude
Vigesimation
Villatick
Villi
Villous
Vimineous
Viol
Virelay
Virility
Virmilion
Virtual
Virtuality
Virtually
Virtuate
Virtue
Virtueless
Virtuoso
Virtuous
Virtuously
Virtuousness
Virulence
Virulency
Virulent
Vitious
Vogue
Voice (noun)
Vouch (noun)
Voucher
Vouchsafe (verb active)
Vouchsafe (verb neuter)
Vouchsafement
Vow (noun)
Vow (verb active)
Vow (verb neuter)
Vowel
Vowfellow
Voyage (noun)
Voyage (verb active)
Voyage (verb neuter)
Voyager
Vulcano
Vulgar (adjective)
Vulgar (noun)
Vulgarity
Vulgarly
Vulnerable
Vulnerary
Vulnerate
Vulpine
Vulterine
Vulture

Cite this page: "Alphabetical List of Entries." A Dictionary of the English Language: A Digital Edition of the 1755 Classic by Samuel Johnson. Edited by Brandi Besalke. Last modified: December 6, 2012. http://johnsonsdictionaryonline.com/?page_id=50.


  1. Wonderful, keep up the good work!

  2. Mike Nightingale on November 18th, 2011 at 11:24 am
  3. Can I help?

  4. Julian Talamantez Brolaski on January 19th, 2012 at 9:33 pm
  5. Proofreading is a big help. If you notice a transcription error, please contact me.

  6. Brandi on January 20th, 2012 at 6:20 am
  7. If time permits, can the words regulate, rule and commerce be added soon? It would be most helpful. Those that discuss the Constitution often reference Johnsons. Thank you.

  8. EE Johnson on February 7th, 2012 at 7:27 am
  9. Brandi on February 7th, 2012 at 8:31 am
  10. I am researching the life of George Ord (1781-1886) of Philadelphia, who is said to have contributed many entries to Johnson’s expanded dictionary (as well as Noah Webster’s first dictionary).

    How may I find out which and how many entries he provided to Johnson’s dictionary.

    Thanks in advance for any help you might provide.

  11. Al Dorof on March 10th, 2012 at 4:39 pm
  12. Al,

    Johnson died in 1784, when Ord was only 3 years old. Any entries linked to Ord which appeared in “Johnson” dictionaries would have been added by later lexicographers (many of whom linked the title of their dictionary to Johnson merely for marketing purposes). I focus on the original dictionary Johnson produced, so I do not know much about post-Johnson additions.

    I was going to suggest looking at the online OED, but I tried searching for George Ord there myself and was unable to find any contributions or sources linked to Ord.

    Sorry that I’m unable to provide any further assistance.

  13. Brandi on March 10th, 2012 at 4:56 pm
  14. Would you be able to transcribe “Indubitable”?

  15. Amanda Patchin on April 18th, 2012 at 10:34 am
  16. There is a transcription error in the second sentence under the letter “h”. It should read: ‘the h in English is scarcely “ever” mute’; not “every”
    Thanks.

  17. Felicia Agyepong on July 12th, 2012 at 4:39 pm
  18. Thanks for catching that. It has been fixed both on the “H” entry page and on the alphabet page.

  19. Brandi on July 13th, 2012 at 6:27 am
  20. trouble is it takes half an hour to find a word if not yet transcribed, since if you want ‘time’ you go to ‘T’ and then have to turn some 50 pages, one at a time, to get to to ‘time’. Why not allow one to select a page by number?

  21. Mark on October 25th, 2012 at 1:44 am
  22. Mark,

    go to “Page View.” Under the title “Page View” and above the image and page number are two drop-down boxes – “Select Section” and “Select Page”. If you wanted to find “time,” for instance, you would select “T” from the first box. This causes the “Select Page” box to be filled in with the pages from the “T” section, enabling you to select “Tillyfally – Time.” Press the “Go” button and that page is loaded.

  23. Brandi on October 25th, 2012 at 8:23 am
  24. Do you have a definition of “arms” as in weaponry? This also is significant in interpreting the constitution.

  25. Misha Dennis on November 23rd, 2012 at 1:07 am
  26. Here it is, newly transcribed from page 159: Arms

  27. Brandi on November 23rd, 2012 at 5:42 pm
  28. I wonder is there was a definition for ‘people’ as in The People…did Johnson define that?

  29. Marco Dz on January 17th, 2013 at 1:24 pm
  30. The first of the five definitions under “People (noun)” is “A nation; these who compose a community,” which includes an illustrative quotation from Shakespeare’s Coriolanus: “What is the city but the people? / True the people are the city.” The entry can be found here.

  31. Brandi on January 17th, 2013 at 1:58 pm
  32. Hi, I was searching for one of the most used words in the 18th century: Nature, but it isn’t here. Can it be added?

  33. Deepali on March 20th, 2013 at 8:53 am
  34. Brandi on March 20th, 2013 at 12:10 pm

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